Collection: Part 1

White Space

Annotation of the brief

Details

Understanding of White Space

 

Photography: 

Negative space, sometimes referred to as white space, is a concept that's been used in art, design, architecture, and sculpture for hundreds of years. It's equally useful in photography, and can be used to turn an average photo into an outstanding one. Negative space is the area which surrounds the main subject in your photo (the main subject is known as the "positive space").

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Lee Shoothead- Powerlines, Cumberland, Maine, USA 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/leecullivan/122271605/

Negative space defines and emphasises the main subject of a photo, drawing your eye to it. It provides "breathing room", giving your eyes somewhere to rest and preventing your image from appearing too cluttered with "stuff". All of this adds up to a more engaging composition. Within photography, negative space creates a balance between the positive space and harmonies the photo. 

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https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/736x/66/9f/33/669f330b8efe17595006daa995ad7e94.jpg

The use of white space in theses photos really interested me. The face that we nominally look down we walking along, but instead here it shows the upward view. It created this silhouette of angles and straight lines which really makes me think about the white space above. 

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This image creates a balance between the negative and positive space. The thin white strip through the middle creates this divide, however it makes the audience focus on the character and creates this visual guide to help the audience focus on the main subject. White space can be used as a guide!

 

Film:  

 

White Space was created as a variation on the theme of Creation. The work uses the Creation story of Adam as a guide ("formed man from the dust of the ground"). A human head appears as animated 'dust' as it emerges from and descends into a chalky white pool. While the non-narrative short film can viewed as the original "man" being created by God, there are also references to science-fiction and the head takes on a ghostly ethereal quality...like an alien being from another planet. Influences of David Lynch as well as the repetitious music of minimalist composers Philip Glass and Steve Reich can also be seen. In addition to directing the video, Jym Davis also appears in the work.

White Space

 

2009 Promax BDA Show opener

Using the specific angle in this film, the audience are made more aware of the creature which is involved in the performance. The white space which surrounds these animals is an essential part of the filming, and makes the subject much more vivid.  

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https://vimeo.com/5240102

 

Hands_onMusic- Robert Schildkopf

 

A white piece of paper lies on a wooden table. Using the stop-motion technique the analogue paper is transformed into a digital work space for the sound application. From a bird's eye view one can see how hands place objects created from paper on the table, use the app, and conduct the audio production.

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Hands_onMusic from Robert Schildkopf on Vimeo.

https://vimeo.com/44963082

 

Screen Print 

 

Designer Tang Yau Hoong uses a simple and straight-forward illustration style to get the most out of the negative space. Using just the two shades allows the clever negative space trick to jump out.

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Tang Yau Hoong- Songbird

 

Using negative space to portray the beauty of nature, we especially love the attention to detail on the leaves.

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FedEx Logo

The white arrow between the E and the X is piercing once seen. This 'hidden arrow' conveys the dynamic attributes that maintains FedEx leadership. The logo has won ample design awards and is constantly featured in 'best logos' lists. The logo was originally designed by Lindon Leader in 1994, he feels the sole purpose of branding is to facilitate the realisation of a client's strategic marketing objectives. The work his studio creates "is not decorative or cosmetic".

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Noma Bar- Don Delillo 

A graduate of the Bezalel Academy of Art & Design, Noma Bar is an award-winning graphic designer, famous for his 'negative space style'. Using a limited colour palette, Bar carefully crafts and places positive space to give the negative space another meaning. Using the bare minimum to communicate his message, Bar's distinctive work has gained him international recognition and work with leading companies including Vodafone, Coca Cola and the BBC.

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Olly Moss

Designer Olly Moss is a master of postive and negative space trickery - a perfect example being this stunning poster he created for Mondo for the 30th anniversary screening of An American Werewolf in London back in 2011. Glaringly obvious, the negative space around the shape of the aerial view of the UK cleverly forms a brilliant illustration of the terrifying creature featured in the movie.

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Edgar Rubin

One of the world's most famous optical illusions, the negative space around the vase cleverly forms the silhouette of two faces. Rubin conveyed a hidden meaning to the image by giving the characteristics of a face imprinted in the vase, which has become a case study for the subject of negative space ever since it was created in the early 1900s.

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http://www.creativebloq.com/art/art-negative-space-8133765

The reason I selected these images was the way they used the negative space to structure an image. Something which creates such a simplistic design but has such a powerful message. 

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Designer/Artists Manifestos

The Stuckist Manifesto, 1999

Established in 1999, the British group the The Stuckists proclaimed themselves to be “Against conceptualism, hedonism and the cult of the ego-artist.” The movement was formed by Billy Childish and Charles Thomson to celebrate and promote figurative painting in a reaction to the proliferation of conceptual art. Every year, the Stuckists famously demonstrate outside Tate Britain as the winner of the Turner Prize is announced.

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1. Stuckism is the quest for authenticity.

2. Painting is the medium of self-discovery.

3. Stuckism proposes a model of art which is holistic.

4. Artists who don’t paint aren’t artists.

5. Art that has to be in a gallery to be art isn’t art.

 

The Laws of Sculptors, Gilbert & George, 1967

Gilbert Proesch and George Passmore met at art school in 1967 and formed a partnership that has lasted for over 40 years. In work that tackles a myriad of social issues - including sex, religion, race, addiction and death - the artists often appear themselves as “living sculptures”, typically dressed in smart grey suits. Their overriding mantra is “Art for all”, a reaction against the intellectual and economical elitism of contemporary art. This wry extract is taken from the pair’s first manifesto of 1969,The Laws of Sculptors.

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1. Always be smartly dressed, well groomed, relaxed, friendly, polite and in complete control.

2. Make the world believe in you and to pay heavily for this privilege.

3. Never worry, assess, discuss or criticize but remain quiet respectful and calm.

4. The Lord chisels still, so don’t leave your bench for long.

 

Red Alan's Manifesto, Grayson Perry RA, 2014

Grayson Perry RA once famously asserted, “I can be outrageous because the vice squad is never going to raid a pottery exhibition.” Through traditional craft – tapestry and ceramics – Perry explores a disparity between form and subject and chronicles contemporary life. In Red Alan’s Manifesto, created for the Royal Academy, Perry provides a witty riposte to some of art’s biggest issues, such as: Can anything be art? Who decides whether art is good or bad? The manifesto is written under the authorship of Red Alan, a ceramic sculpture of his childhood teddy bear, Alan Measles.

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Nothing in art is new or old fashioned, only good or bad.

 

https://www.royalacademy.org.uk/article/ten-game-changing-manifestos 

Details

Designer/Artists Manifestos

Bruce Mau- Know Canada 

In April 2012, Bruce Mau Design set out to rethink how Canada appears in the world, creating a new identity for the 21st century Canada free of any stereotypes such as hockey, beavers and maple syrup. The "Know Canada" identity and campaign, based on a creative brief from WNYC's radio show Studio 360, begins with the assertion that people beyond our borders simply don’t understand Canada. BMD’s view is that Canada doesn’t need a redesign; rather, people need to be educated.

The manifesto of this particular design is to declare the country’s dynamic exchange of ideas, creativity, natural resources and people. The two red bars either side represent the flag of Canada but without the maple leaf in the centre, these red bars act as a container for a rich array of viewpoints, imagery and understanding, while also paying homage to the country's rich history.

The minimalist approach yet the vidid array of views, creates this opinion that Canada is not just restricted to it's stereotypical components but has a lot more to offer.

http://youtu.be/uzHvFya1FpU

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http://www.brucemaudesign.com/work/know-canada

 

Christo and Jeanne-Claude 

 

Christo and Jeanne-Claude's works are entire environments, whether they are urban or rural. The artists temporarily use one part of the environment. In doing so, we see and perceive the whole environment with new eyes and a new consciousness. The effect lasts longer than the actual work of art. Years after every physical trace has been removed and the materials recycled, original visitors can still see and feel them in their minds when they return to the sites of the artworks.

When Christo began to wrap objects in 1958, he used everyday objects such as shoes, telephones and empty paint cans to make his sculptures. Once wrapped, the objects would take on a new identity. By wrapping them, he would reveal some of the most basic features and proportions of the object by concealing the actual item. Christo and Jeanne-Claude later expanded this idea in projects such as The Pont Neuf Wrapped and the Wrapped Reichstag, but on a much larger scale. While the intricate details of the structures are hidden, the essence of the structures are revealed all the while making the imposing and solid structure seem airy and nomadic.

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Christo Wrapped Reichstag (Project for Berlin) Collage 1995 14 x 22" (35.5 x 56 cm) Pencil, enamel paint, wax crayon, photograph by Wolfgang Volz, charcoal, map, fabric sample and tape Photo: Wolfgang Volz

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Christo and Jeanne-Claude Wrapped Reichstag, Berlin, 1971-95 Photo: Wolfgang Volz

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Christo and Jeanne-Claude Wrapped Reichstag, Berlin, 1971-95 Photo: Wolfgang Volz

http://christojeanneclaude.net/projects/wrapped-reichstag#.Vj91G-uZbdk

What I like most about this project is the ambition of covering these large scale building and the quality of standard it is done to. Theses incredible silhouettes create a beautiful architectural piece but also the context of covering this particular building too, is dramatic. Its involvement in the war, and how it nows holds such peace with the white material covering it, is an extremely clever use of the juxtaposition of ideals. 

 

Spin-

Alberto Giacometti Exhibition

Identity concept and creation, Printed matter, Catalogue cover design, Environmental graphics. 

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Type Plus 

Type Plus investigates the practice of combining typography with images to increase effectiveness, potency and visual impact. Today, graphic designers use type in partnership with graphic elements in ways that turbo charge meaning and impact. Type plus image – or images – can greatly enhance typographic expression. And letterforms themselves, when redrawn, combined, distorted, or augmented with decorative embellishments, can enhance meaning and lend emotive qualities to all kinds of typographic communication. 

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Spin Design approach: We value intelligent, informed creative responses and our process is supported by research, strategy development and workshops when required. This approach ensures that our response is particular to the brief we are given, and is always apposite and bespoke.

 

Details

Brian Eno- Oblique Strategies

Oblique Strategies is a deck of 7-by-9-centimetre printed cards in a black container box, created by Brian Eno and Peter Schmidt and first published in 1975. Each card offers help artists (particularly musicians) break creative blocks by encouraging lateral thinking.

This is a clear set of rules to rule, as you follow the instructions on the card. The white space, with a simple black intention maximises the direct approach to take.

Each card contains a phrase or cryptic remark which can be used to break a deadlock or dilemma situation. Some are specific to music composition; others are more general.

Examples include: Use an old idea. State the problem in words as clearly as possible. Only one element of each kind. What would your closest friend do? What to increase? What to reduce? Are there sections? Consider transitions. Try faking it! Honour thy error as a hidden intention. Ask your body. Work at a different speed.

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http://nestersteachingblog.com/2010/04/02/revision-technique-use-an-oblique-strategy/

 

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Christine Sun Kim

Christine Sun Kim is an American sound artist who has been deaf since birth. Based in New York City, she started as a visual artist, but started to be attracted to sound as a medium because of the "rules" society attaches to it and her disconnect from sound as most people experience it. She states her mission as to "unlearn sound etiquette." 

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Exploring the physicality of sound through vibration, she aims to bring sound into a realm where it is accessible for her. This involves being able to see and feel the effects of the sound, allowing her to experience sound. The portrait focuses on her relationship with the sonic world and the way she has transformed what most of us take for granted into an entirely visual and physical experience. Kim experiments with the vibration, its effect on different materials such as paper, balloons, string and paint, and footage of her at work in the studio is mesmerising–she is focused, calm, and moves about between her instruments as if she is completely at home.

Christine Sun Kim, A Selby Film from the selby on Vimeo.

This short film highlights how Kim uses objects, paint and materials to create a visual sound. This to me communicates extremely well. The translation of sound through art and drawing helps on a personal level to express the vibrations that surround KIm. 

 

https://medium.com/ted-fellows/i-am-a-deaf-artist-redefining-sound-4437f20297a3

I Am a Deaf Artist Redefining “Sound”

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“Making lists like this helps me recognize how little and much I know about loudness and quietness. There will be more lists to come.” Image: Artisphere

Can you tell me about the various ways that you experience sound without hearing it? I’m curious how this ties into your artwork and the various ways you explore.

For a piece called “Feedback Aftermath,” I played with feedback for hours one night and then went home. At home I didn’t feel good — I felt anxious. I couldn’t sleep well that night, and I didn’t want to go back to the studio for one week. That was disconcerting. And then when I watched the video of myself — because I videotape myself sometimes — I felt sort of stressed out and uneasy. Later I realized that it had an impact on me, an extreme impact, like post-traumatic stress. Most hearing people don’t experience that. You have warning signals. If your ears hurt, you leave the room, you stop, you step away. I don’t have those signals, so I went past all warnings and experienced feedback to the full degree.

Response from Kim. 

https://vimeo.com/77957602

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“Nothing’s binary in music, and I used four long beams as an “almost” score.” Image: Christine Sun Kim

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My Voice Has a Personality and a Pair of Legs. 11x15", charcoal on paper. “I have worked with a number of interpreters everywhere I go, and depending on job situations, I sometimes get two, three or even four interpreters as my voice.” Image: Christine Sun Kim

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Christine Sun Kim, photographed for her Lincoln Reimagine Project, an art installation which turned attendees into musical instruments. Photo by: Chris Ozer for The Lincoln Motor Company.

https://vimeo.com/100712375

 

Details

Dans Le Noir?

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Outside the restaurant. When you are inside you have to put all your belongings into a locker and enter the blacked out room holding the right shoulder of the person in front of you. 

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At the end of the experience the staff reveal the dishes which you have eaten. 

The Dans Le Noir is a culinary experience with a difference. You eat completely in the dark, without even being able to see the hands in front of your face. Blind guides, lead you around to your table and serve as waiters as well during the evening. This will be a great place to go and understand more about as it will allow myself to understand about removing the sense of sight, how it will effect me and what I will do in response to not having it. I can then transfer this research and understanding into my work. 

You have the choice between 4 different surprise menus:

White: Chef Surprise - exotic and unusual

Blue: Fish and seafood menu

Red: Meat menu

Green: Vegetarian menu

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